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Complaints Procedure


Insolvency Practitioners who provide advice on behalf of The Insolvency Practice are either regulated by The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales or by the Insolvency Practitioner Association.

If for any reason you are dissatisfied with the services you are receiving, please contact us. We will carefully consider any complaint we receive and, if we believe that we have given a less than satisfactory service, we will take all reasonable steps to put it right.

Whilst we undertake to look into any complaint carefully and promptly and to do all we can to explain the position to you, if you remain unsatisfied, you have the right to refer the matter to the Insolvency Complaints Gateway which is operated by the Insolvency Service, an Executive Agency of the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (“BEIS”).

Complaints can be submitted via an online complaints form at www.gov.uk/complain-about-insolvency-practitioner (Guidance for those who wish to complain can also be found on this site).

If you have difficulty accessing the online complaints form you can also make any complaint through the Insolvency Service Enquiry Line – email insolvency.enquiryline@insolvency.gsi.gov.uk or alternatively telephone 0300 678 0015 (Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm).

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Case Study 1 – Security Services Company


Contracts had not been costed properly and the accounting system was non existent. The company was leaking money and when we scratched the surface it was clear that large debts had built up.


Case Study 2 – Builder


The downturn in the housing market saw a major change in fortunes for this company. Contracts disappeared and existing projects were scaled back. Having taken on employees and bought additional equipment during the housing boom this left the business in an impossible situation.


Case Study 3 – Florist


Like most businesses this limited company saw a fall in sales as the recession took hold. Flowers were seen as a luxury item and with money tight customers dried up. The bigger wedding and corporate buyers also began to spend less.